7 Ways On How To Make A Dog Stop Snoring

Does your dog turn into a snoring machine when sleeping? If so, you need to know how to make a dog stop snoring. This will prevent the loud snores from disrupting your own sleep. Take note that dogs can snore day and night once they fall asleep. Don’t worry because there’s always a workaround to stop the noisy problem.

What causes a dog to snore?

There are several reasons why dogs snore louder and more frequent than others. The following are the culprits behind your dog’ cacophonous sleep:

  • It’s in the breed. The most common reason why dogs snore is their breed. Brachycephalic or flat-nosed canines like Pugs, Bulldogs, Boston Terriers, Boxers, and Shih Tzus are prone to snoring. This is due to their shorter muzzles that makes their nostrils collapse during sleep. When they breathe, the restricted nostrils will produce a snoring sound.
  • It could be allergies. Another possible reason for the snoring problem is an allergic reaction. The irritants will cause your dog to snore. It could be allergens it got outdoors or the grooming products you’re using on them.
  • There’s a blockage. If your dog suddenly starts snoring loudly, it’s best to consult the vet. There’s a possibility that a foreign object got stuck on their breathing passages. As the air gets blocked, it will produce a loud sound.
  • Unhealthy weight. Obesity is also a leading reason why dogs snore. The excess fat can constrict the dog’s air passages. It will also cause heart problems, not to mention that your dog’s soft palate can also swell. This could lead to a blocked airway and one hell of snoring.
  • Certain medications. Medications can also make your dog snore as the pharmaceuticals cause airway obstruction. It’s important to raise this concern to your dog’s veterinarian as it can indicate an adverse side effect.

How can I get my dog to stop snoring?

If your dog is a loud sleeper, the following will help fix or reduce its snoring:

1. Get the dog checked

The very first thing you should do is bring your snoring dog to the vet’s clinic. Remember that snoring isn’t a normal bodily response. It’s always due to something, be it physical or physiological.

The proper examination will identify if your dog has blockages on its airway. In some cases, pet owners are surprised by a health problem diagnosis that’s causing the constant snoring.

Also, the vet can suggest the best solution to reduce your dog’s snoring. This will give you peace of mind.

2. Change the sleeping position

Another thing you can do is changing your dog’s sleeping position. Dogs tend to snore when they are sleeping on their back. Try rolling the pup to its side and see if it will stop snoring. The only problem here is that some dogs really like sleeping on their backs, just like my fluffy Sherlock.

You can also switch your dog to a bolstered bed, so it can prop its head on the raised edges. This should help expand the airway and reduce snoring.

3. Help the dog lose weight

If your dog is overweight or obese, it’s important to help it lose weight. Aside from snoring, the excess weight will also lead to a slew of other health problems.

Take note that weight loss should be done slowly and carefully. You can always involve the vet to know the best routine and diet for your pet.

The problem with flat-nosed canines is that they aren’t just prone to snoring; many of them are also couch potatoes. With this, you have to come up with a routine that will encourage your dog to get up and burn calories. Start with typical walks, then add more activities from there.

4. Limit irritants

Are you smoking at home? If so, don’t be surprised why your dog is snoring like a banshee. Smoke is an allergen, and it will irritate your dog’s airways. And for canines with asthma, smoke will make their condition worse.

During the allergy season, it’s best to keep your dog indoors. This way, it won’t be exposed to the increased pollen content in the air.

Most of all, you should vacuum your home regularly. It’s also important that you clean your dog’s bed and toys periodically.

5. Keep the air humid

Dry air makes a dog’s snoring even worse. This happens even more during the winter season when the air becomes very dry. And if your AC is in full-blast, it will have the same effect on humidity.

To fix this problem, you can use a humidifier. This will help loosen your dog’s airway to potentially reduce snoring.

6. Change the dog’s sleeping area

You can also try changing your dog’s sleeping quarters and see if the snoring will stop. Your dog’s current sleeping area may have irritants or very dry air. Pair this with the other tips above to ensure that your pet’s noisy snoring will stop.

You should avoid letting your dog sleep in your bedroom. The loud snoring will surely give you sleepless nights.

7. Ask the vet about medications

Lastly, you can consult your pet’s veterinarian about potential medications that can help with your dog’s snoring. There’s an over-the-counter product called SnoreStop that promises to stop your dog’s loud snores. However, I don’t recommend using this until you’ve talked to your dog’s vet.

Never self-medicate your dog’s snoring as it could only lead to more problems. If you’re considering the use of medications, the vet is the best person to talk to.

What dog breeds snore a lot?

Not all dogs snore, but there are some breeds that are more prone to sounding off during sleep. The following are some of them:

  • Pugs
  • English Bulldog
  • French Bulldog
  • Pit Bull
  • Pekingese
  • Shih Tzu
  • Boston Terrier
  • Boxer

These are just some of the dog breeds prone to snoring. Aside from that, these deep-chested are also known for farting too often.

While it’s typical for those canines to snore, it’s best to consult the vet if it’s becoming too loud and frequent. Your dog might be dealing with breathing problems that require veterinary attention.

Should I worry if my dog’s snoring wakes him up?

Sometimes, a dog’s snore will be too loud that it will wake the dog itself. This can happen from time to time, but I suggest that you take your pet to the vet’s clinic. In some cases, it may not be snoring that wakes the dog up but a condition called sleep apnea.

Canines with sleep apnea will temporarily stop breathing in their sleep. The body’s reaction will be to jolt awake to gasp for breath. As with human sleep apnea, this condition will impact your dog’s sleep quality and overall health.

It’s important to diagnose sleep apnea in dogs. This way, you can make changes to their sleeping area, lifestyle, and diet.

If your dog has sleep apnea, you should never let it sleep on elevated surfaces. The sudden awakening will cause them to fall and get hurt.

Conclusion

Knowing how to make a dog stop snoring will be beneficial for you and your pet. You can now have a more restful sleep while your dog will get proper veterinary care if need be. Remember that snoring isn’t normal, so having your dog checked is always the best move.